Gallery

Inspiration

Emil Nolde

Sunflowers in the Windstorm

1943

The unimaginable turmoil of war represented through the persistence of resilient beauty amidst overwhelming chaos.

Rébecca Dautremer

Jonah and the Whale

2014

Dreamlike illustration with an incredible sense of scale and stunning light recasts a familiar story with extraordinary perspective. (More of her work can be found here.)

Michael Muller

Robert Downey, Jr

Muller’s portraiture has an intimacy and candidness few others can match. His best work captures what would be moments between frames for anyone else, and this is still a rarity among them. (More of his work can be found here.)

Mary Ellen Matthews

Will Ferrell for SNL

Mary Ellen Matthews is among the most creative photographers working today. She combines the most clever ideas amidst the immense pressure of SNL’s breakneck pace, and always turns out something fun and inspiring. (More of her work can be found here.)

Pavel Tchelitchew

Hide-and-Seek

1940-1942

It’s impossible to capture the power of this piece in any other manner than viewing in person. At roughly 6.5 feet tall by 7 feet wide, it simply overwhelms. It’s an endless visual journey of life and death, as Tchelitchew meditates on the concept of metamorphosis around a curious, hand-shaped tree he often passed, painting through the pandemonium of World War II.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, PT.1

The Three Brothers

2010

Amidst my favorite film in the Harry Potter series sits my favorite sequence in nearly any film. The animation is haunting and captivating, perfectly matching the tale being narrated.

Bon Iver

I Can’t Make You Love Me

2011

Of the few perfect songs which exist, Bruce Hornsby’s tragic ballad, first performed by Bonnie Raitt, is my absolute favorite. Justin Vernon’s falsetto, cracking and breaking through this performance, manages even more heartbreak than the original, and yet he brings it to a stunning conclusion by tagging another of Raitt’s songs, turning tragedy into resolution. The video itself takes a backseat to the story of the song and the emotion in his delivery.